Clockmakers developed their art in various ways. Building smaller clocks was a technical challenge, as was improving accuracy and reliability. Clocks could be impressive showpieces to demonstrate skilled craftsmanship, or less expensive, mass-produced items for domestic use. The escapement in particular was an important factor affecting the clock's accuracy, so many different mechanisms were tried.
Minimalist design and modern style combine in this 11" wall clock. Set under a clear glass lens on chrome posts, the streamlined dial showcases chrome military indicators on the 12, 3, 6, and 9 over a warm brown woodgrain background, while the unadorned face of the clock takes the form of a brushed metal disk. Operated by a AA battery (not included), a quartz crystal movement keeps the simple baton hour, minute, and second hands ticking away in time.

This selection offers an analog display with hands and a built-in digital wall clock. Metallic gray wall clock with a flat bezel framing the dial. White dial with large black Arabic numerals, black hour, minute and second hands beneath a glass crystal. LCD calendar in the dial displays the month, date, and day of the week. Quartz, battery operated movement.

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The piezoelectric properties of crystalline quartz were discovered by Jacques and Pierre Curie in 1880.[49][50] The first crystal oscillator was invented in 1917 by Alexander M. Nicholson after which, the first quartz crystal oscillator was built by Walter G. Cady in 1921.[2] In 1927 the first quartz clock was built by Warren Marrison and J. W. Horton at Bell Telephone Laboratories in Canada.[51][2] The following decades saw the development of quartz clocks as precision time measurement devices in laboratory settings—the bulky and delicate counting electronics, built with vacuum tubes, limited their practical use elsewhere. The National Bureau of Standards (now NIST) based the time standard of the United States on quartz clocks from late 1929 until the 1960s, when it changed to atomic clocks.[52] In 1969, Seiko produced the world's first quartz wristwatch, the Astron.[53] Their inherent accuracy and low cost of production resulted in the subsequent proliferation of quartz clocks and watches.[49]
The ancient Greek philosopher Plato (428–348 BC) was said to possess a large water clock with an unspecified alarm signal similar to the sound of a water organ; he used it at night, possibly for signaling the beginning of his lectures at dawn (Athenaeus 4.174c).[2] The Hellenistic engineer and inventor Ctesibius (fl. 285–222 BC) fitted his clepsydras with dial and pointer for indicating the time, and added elaborate "alarm systems, which could be made to drop pebbles on a gong, or blow trumpets (by forcing bell-jars down into water and taking the compressed air through a beating reed) at pre-set times" (Vitruv 11.11).[3]
This 33" metal wall clock features an antique nickel-finished frame is 7" wide and curves down from the face to the wall hiding the almost 3" in depth. The frame also features 100 decorative nail heads in two rows one on the inside of the frame and one on the outside of the frame.The accurate Quartz movement is operated by one AA battery. One year warranty and Free Shipping.
Time can be smart, clever, ultra-stylish, functional and simple with this Cube Click Desktop Clock. This Cube Click Desktop Clock can tell you the time, date and temperature alternately in blue LED color on a black wood-effect block at the click of your fingers and automatically switches off when the room is quiet, lighting up again when the alarm goes off or as a response to clicked fingers or clapped hands. The numbers seem to float on the lovely wooden block, but that's just half the magic...

Although it isn’t strictly an “alarm clock,” the Google Home Hub can wake you up in the morning and do so much more. One of the most drastic differences between the Home Hub and other comparable devices is its size; the Home Hub stands at a mere 4.5 inches tall. This makes it small enough to fit comfortably on a nightstand. That small frame is partly due to the lack of a camera, which may be a pro or a con depending on how much you value your privacy. The Home Hub connects to the various Bluetooth-enabled devices you might have throughout your home, including lights, speakers, thermostat, etc. You can set up the Home Hub to respond to your voice commands, or manage devices using the touchscreen. For the purposes of an alarm clock, the Home Hub works terrifically. You can set a normal alarm, or even have the Hub wake you with a specific song from your music library. Given the Hub’s lackluster built-in speakers, however, you may want to connect it to your sound system if you have one. For more details, read our full review.


“This was a gift for my elderly, cognitively impaired mother. She was very often confused as to which day it was, the time of day, etc. She would show up at appointments on the wrong day, or think it was morning when it was evening. This clock is fantastic! It has made such a difference. Now she always knows what day and time it is. The clock is also very nice-looking. This was an excellent purchase and highly recommended. I can’t say enough good things about it.”
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