Certainly not just for telling time, wall clocks are perfect for adding artful appeal to your kitchen wall or acting as a focal point above the living room mantel. Take this one for example: a true traditional, its Roman numeral dial is accented by a world map detailing the face. Crafted from plastic, its frame offers more of a metal-inspired look with molded trim and a bronze finish. Requires one AA battery.
“I have searched for a well-designed clock for kids and was so pleased I finally made this purchase. It was definitely pricier than other options, but this one is actually well-designed, usable, and does all the functions well. My daughter loves how cute it is, and the yellow light and green light has allowed us to get more sleep in the mornings, which is priceless. … We don’t use the nap feature or white noise machine all that much, but we like the night-light and wake-up training features. The size is perfect, and it’s not too bright. Plus it has the time on it, which is perfect for my preschooler who is learning about time.”
Tired of the same old clock hanging on your wall? Is the incessant ticking of the time a constant reminder you need to change it out? Purchase a new wall clock from our great selection. All of Zazzle's wall clock designs are printed in full color, so the design you choose will look vibrant for a long time. Not only can you choose from our great designs, you can also pick whether you want a round, square, or aqua clock to help keep track of time. Browse through the collection to find a clock you'll love every second and every minute!
If you’ve never seen an alarm clock that can project the time onto the wall, you may be surprised at how handy this function can be. This Mesqool clock can project the time onto the ceiling, the curtains, or just about any other surface, thanks to the 180-degree swivel. So instead of squinting at the clock through sleepy eyes in the morning, you can just look up at the ceiling. The clock also includes AM/FM Radio, so you can listen to your favorite morning talk shows or follow along with your sports team while you get ready in the morning.
In 1675, Huygens and Robert Hooke invented the spiral balance spring, or the hairspring, designed to control the oscillating speed of the balance wheel. This crucial advance finally made accurate pocket watches possible. The great English clockmaker, Thomas Tompion, was one of the first to use this mechanism successfully in his pocket watches, and he adopted the minute hand which, after a variety of designs were trialled, eventually stabilised into the modern-day configuration.[40] The rack and snail striking mechanism for striking clocks, was introduced during the 17th century and had distinct advantages over the 'countwheel' (or 'locking plate') mechanism. During the 20th century there was a common misconception that Edward Barlow invented rack and snail striking. In fact, his invention was connected with a repeating mechanism employing the rack and snail.[41] The repeating clock, that chimes the number of hours (or even minutes) was invented by either Quare or Barlow in 1676. George Graham invented the deadbeat escapement for clocks in 1720.

Water clocks, also known as clepsydrae (sg: clepsydra), along with the sundials, are possibly the oldest time-measuring instruments, with the only exceptions being the vertical gnomon and the day counting tally stick.[9] Given their great antiquity, where and when they first existed is not known and perhaps unknowable. The bowl-shaped outflow is the simplest form of a water clock and is known to have existed in Babylon and in Egypt around the 16th century BC. Other regions of the world, including India and China, also have early evidence of water clocks, but the earliest dates are less certain. Some authors, however, write about water clocks appearing as early as 4000 BC in these regions of the world.[10]
The oldest surviving clock in England is that at Salisbury Cathedral, which dates from 1386. A clock erected at Rouen, France, in 1389 is still extant, and one built for Wells Cathedral in England is preserved in the Science Museum in London. The Salisbury clock strikes the hours, and those of Rouen and Wells also have mechanisms for chiming at the quarter hour. These clocks are large, iron-framed structures driven by falling weights attached to a cord wrapped around a drum and regulated by a mechanism known as a verge (or crown wheel) escapement. Their errors probably were as large as a half hour per day. The first domestic clocks were smaller wall-mounted versions of these large public clocks. They appeared late in the 14th century, and few examples have survived; most of them, extremely austere in design, had no cases or means of protection from dust.
If the four alarms you scheduled to go off 10 minutes apart wake your neighbors but not you, you might want to try this noisy clock; it has a 113-decibel alarm—about as loud as a jackhammer. And if the volume alone won't do it, the red flashing lights and accompanying bed-shaker unit (which goes beneath your mattress) should deliver the full sensory message that grave danger awaits unless you get out of bed.
A perfect piece for nightstands and home office desks, this radio alarm clock tunes to your favorite stations as it keeps an eye on the hour. Its bright red LED numbers are easy to read from afar, while the repeating nine-minute snooze is sure to become your new best friend on lazy Sunday mornings. This digital clock includes memory for up to 20 radio stations and includes an audio input for smartphones and MP3 players. Though this radio plugs into your wall, it also runs on two AAA batteries...

In 1283, a large clock was installed at Dunstable Priory; its location above the rood screen suggests that it was not a water clock.[citation needed] In 1292, Canterbury Cathedral installed a 'great horloge'. Over the next 30 years there are mentions of clocks at a number of ecclesiastical institutions in England, Italy, and France. In 1322, a new clock was installed in Norwich, an expensive replacement for an earlier clock installed in 1273. This had a large (2 metre) astronomical dial with automata and bells. The costs of the installation included the full-time employment of two clockkeepers for two years.[citation needed]
Slave clocks, used in large institutions and schools from the 1860s to the 1970s, kept time with a pendulum, but were wired to a master clock in the building, and periodically received a signal to synchronize them with the master, often on the hour.[71] Later versions without pendulums were triggered by a pulse from the master clock and certain sequences used to force rapid synchronization following a power failure.
Small in size but striking in style, this eye-catching wall clock brings a dash of contemporary flair to any arrangement in your home. Showcasing a sunburst silhouette measuring 20" in diameter, this round silver-finished design is crafted with an iron and mirrored frame comprised of black spokes with orb-like accents. A petite glass clock face with sword-style hands sits in the center, allowing you to keep an eye on the hour in any room.
In mechanical clocks this is done mechanically by a gear train, known as the wheel train. The gear train also has a second function; to transmit mechanical power from the power source to run the oscillator. There is a friction coupling called the 'cannon pinion' between the gears driving the hands and the rest of the clock, allowing the hands to be turned to set the time.[73]
The tick duration must be positive. If it has a part smaller than a whole millisecond, then the whole duration must divide into one second without leaving a remainder. All normal tick durations will match these criteria, including any multiple of hours, minutes, seconds and milliseconds, and sensible nanosecond durations, such as 20ns, 250,000ns and 500,000ns.

An on-trend take on a retro design, this 12" round wall clock brings a splash of color to any space in your home. This budget-friendly accent showcases a circular face bordered by alternating blocks of green, blue, and red hues with black Roman numerals in the center. Its plastic frame ensures that it’s lightweight and easy to hang, while its metallic pierced hands offer subtle shimmer. This piece does not include batteries.

“I am the heaviest sleeper and was setting four or five alarms on my phone to wake me up. After being late a few times, I decided to purchase this alarm clock to help me wake up on time. I couldn’t be happier with my purchase. … The bed shaker is super important. I put it under my pillow, and it shook me awake; the loud beep helped too. If you can sleep through earthquakes and shouting family members, this is the alarm clock for you.”

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