In a pendulum clock an escape wheel is allowed to rotate through the pitch of one tooth for each double swing of the pendulum and to transmit an impulse to the pendulum to keep it swinging. An ideal escapement would transmit the impulse without interfering with the free swing, and the impulse should be as uniform as possible. The double three-legged gravity escapement, which achieves the second of these but not the first, was invented by Edmund Beckett, afterward Lord Grimthorpe, and used by him for the great clock at Westminster, now generally known as Big Ben, which was installed in 1859. It became the standard for all really accurate tower clocks.
A major stimulus to improving the accuracy and reliability of clocks was the importance of precise time-keeping for navigation. The position of a ship at sea could be determined with reasonable accuracy if a navigator could refer to a clock that lost or gained less than about 10 seconds per day. This clock could not contain a pendulum, which would be virtually useless on a rocking ship. In 1714, the British government offered large financial rewards to the value of 20,000 pounds,[42] for anyone who could determine longitude accurately. John Harrison, who dedicated his life to improving the accuracy of his clocks, later received considerable sums under the Longitude Act.
late 14c., clokke, originally "clock with bells," probably from Middle Dutch clocke (Dutch klok) "a clock," from Old North French cloque (Old French cloke, Modern French cloche), from Medieval Latin (7c.) clocca "bell," probably from Celtic (cf. Old Irish clocc, Welsh cloch, Manx clagg "a bell") and spread by Irish missionaries (unless the Celtic words are from Latin); ultimately of imitative origin.
Go to bed with positive thoughts. Tell yourself, “I want to get up early because…” and then, actually do it. Sleep studies happen all the time, and they tell us what exterior activities are affecting our dreams, our nightmares, etc., and talking to yourself as you drift off to bed has been proven to work. If you’re looking forward to something in the morning, tell yourself about it, and your body will hold onto that through the night.
A brushed and polished brass finish gives this metal carriage alarm clock its enduring style. The decorative handle, turned brass button feet, and polished brass-tone columns at the corners add to the clock's stately presence. Beneath a glass crystal, the brushed brass-tone dial features circular, diamond-cut numeral ring, black Roman numerals, black hour and minute hands, and brass second and alarm hands.

Bring elegant, antique style to your walls with this 23.25" wall clock. Crafted of manufactured wood and plastic, this clock’s dial showcases large Arabic numerals printed in weathered beige over the hand-painted royal red face. A battery-operated movement keeps spade hour and minute hands ticking away in time over the words “Hotel Westminster” and “Pairs Rue de la Paix” written in swirling cursive script. Distressed details and fleur-de-lis accents round out the design, imbuing a...


At home in the most up-to-date atmospheres, this wall clock combines a Merlot Cherry finish with brushed nickel accents. The brushed nickel-finished pendulum and bezel add to the contemporary styling. The crisp white dial features black bar hour markers and black hour and minute hands. Finished in Merlot Cherry, a very dark maroon finish that is leaning toward black on an injected molded body. Quartz, battery operated movement.
You can set the clock to release aromatherapeutic scents in tandem with the light, choosing from four different fragrances that come with the clock or using your own essential oil blend. Fifteen minutes before your wake-up time, it'll also emit your choice of soft nature noises. The cycle ends with a chiming noise that gradually grows in volume to ensure that even the heaviest sleepers will wake up.
In 1675, Huygens and Robert Hooke invented the spiral balance spring, or the hairspring, designed to control the oscillating speed of the balance wheel. This crucial advance finally made accurate pocket watches possible. The great English clockmaker, Thomas Tompion, was one of the first to use this mechanism successfully in his pocket watches, and he adopted the minute hand which, after a variety of designs were trialled, eventually stabilised into the modern-day configuration.[40] The rack and snail striking mechanism for striking clocks, was introduced during the 17th century and had distinct advantages over the 'countwheel' (or 'locking plate') mechanism. During the 20th century there was a common misconception that Edward Barlow invented rack and snail striking. In fact, his invention was connected with a repeating mechanism employing the rack and snail.[41] The repeating clock, that chimes the number of hours (or even minutes) was invented by either Quare or Barlow in 1676. George Graham invented the deadbeat escapement for clocks in 1720.
This Mission style wall clock is finished in a Mission Oak dark finish. A parchment dial features dark brown numerals and hands. Decorative, wooden moldings frame the dial. Circular brushed brass swinging pendulum is antiqued and framed with wooden, reeded grilles. Quartz, dual chime movement plays Westminster or Ave Maria chimes, and features volume control and automatic nighttime shut-off option. Shadow collection - matching floor clock available. Size: H. 32-1/2" W.16-3/4" D.6"
This selection offers an analog display with hands and a built-in digital wall clock. Metallic gray wall clock with a flat bezel framing the dial. White dial with large black Arabic numerals, black hour, minute and second hands beneath a glass crystal. LCD calendar in the dial displays the month, date, and day of the week. Quartz, battery operated movement.
Time switches can be used to turn on anything that will awaken a sleeper, and can therefore be used as alarms. Lights, bells, and radio and TV sets can easily be used.[32] More elaborate devices have also been used, such as machines that automatically prepare tea or coffee. A sound is produced when the drink is ready, so the sleeper awakes to find the freshly brewed drink waiting.[33]
In mechanical clocks this is done mechanically by a gear train, known as the wheel train. The gear train also has a second function; to transmit mechanical power from the power source to run the oscillator. There is a friction coupling called the 'cannon pinion' between the gears driving the hands and the rest of the clock, allowing the hands to be turned to set the time.[73]
"Love it...Love it....Just a basic alarm clock needed one to check that my FM transmitter is on the correct frequency one that had a digital tuner fits the bill just fine and a battery back up clock for time announcements ....What can I say, it's a quality alarm, that never fails, and is not expensive Not once has this alarm failed to wake me up, Digits are bright and easy to see If I were to say something negative, The time is a little too fast (in a month you'll notice your like a minute or two ahead of the actual time, easy fix though) And the radio connection needs to better"

A perfect piece for nightstands and home office desks, this radio alarm clock tunes to your favorite stations as it keeps an eye on the hour. Its bright red LED numbers are easy to read from afar, while the repeating nine-minute snooze is sure to become your new best friend on lazy Sunday mornings. This digital clock includes memory for up to 20 radio stations and includes an audio input for smartphones and MP3 players. Though this radio plugs into your wall, it also runs on two AAA batteries...


“I am the heaviest sleeper and was setting four or five alarms on my phone to wake me up. After being late a few times, I decided to purchase this alarm clock to help me wake up on time. I couldn’t be happier with my purchase. … The bed shaker is super important. I put it under my pillow, and it shook me awake; the loud beep helped too. If you can sleep through earthquakes and shouting family members, this is the alarm clock for you.”
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