If the last thing you do before closing your eyes for the night is pick up your cell phone to set the alarm, how likely is it that you're just going to do that one thing, then set the phone down on the nightstand? Admit it, you're probably going to check your Instagram, send a text or two, play just one more round of your favorite game, or surf the web.
This oversized aged metal wall clock is 31.5" square and is finished in aged white and gray. The aged dial with aged black Roman numerals and aged black spade hour and minute hands sits behind a glass crystal and is surrounded by a formed metal bezel finished in aged white and gray. Quartz, battery-operated movement requires one AA sized battery (not included). One year warranty and Free Shipping.
If you have a serious problem sleeping through your alarm, this retro little clock is for you. Because it doesn’t have a snooze button, you’ll be forced to either shut the alarm off completely and risk oversleeping, or you’ll learn to rise with the alarm. Also good: it’s doesn’t have an annoying ticking sound like other vintage clocks, so you won’t be kept awake at night.
While it’s not to be used in lieu of an alarm clock, this handy app will aggravate the hell out of you until you’re awake. You have to vigorously shake your phone for the duration of time previously set, or it’ll keep going. Pair this with sixty seconds after your new alarm clock going off, and you’ll throw yourself into a frenzy that you’ll need to power through to get out of. By that point, you’re already up.
From the 14th century, some clock towers in Western Europe were also capable of chiming at a fixed time every day; the earliest of these was described by the Florentine writer Dante Alighieri in 1319.[8] The most famous original striking clock tower still standing is possibly the one in St Mark's Clocktower in St Mark's Square, Venice. The St Mark's Clock was assembled in 1493, by the famous clockmaker Gian Carlo Rainieri from Reggio Emilia, where his father Gian Paolo Rainieri had already constructed another famous device in 1481. In 1497, Simone Campanato moulded the great bell (h. 1,56 m., diameter m. 1,27), which was put on the top of the tower where it was alternatively beaten by the Due Mori (Two Moors), two bronze statues (h. 2,60) handling a hammer.
Don't worry, Zeus didn't show up to your home, but you'll certainly feel that way when waking up to this unit's thunderous, 113-decibel buzzing. Fair warning: It's definitely loud, so it's a good pick only if you're a heavy, heavy sleeper. Just in case the noise somehow isn't enough to pry you out of bed, this alarm clock flashes multiple bright red LEDs and comes with a bed shaker that'll really get you going. Trust us, if that sensory overload doesn't get the job done, nothing will.
This dual tone wall clock features a handsome Rustic Cherry finish with a contrasting Vintage Umber inset panel. The wood stick moving pendulum features a spun brass-finished bob. Beneath a convex glass crystal, the dial features a two color wood-tone dial with gold Arabic numerals and aged brass-tone spade hands. Finished in distressed Rustic Cherry on select hardwoods and veneers. Quartz, non-chiming battery operated movement.
Most digital computers depend on an internal signal at constant frequency to synchronize processing; this is referred to as a clock signal. (A few research projects are developing CPUs based on asynchronous circuits.) Some equipment, including computers, also maintains time and date for use as required; this is referred to as time-of-day clock, and is distinct from the system clock signal, although possibly based on counting its cycles.
Revamp the interiors of your living room with the Howard Miller Cooper Table Alarm Clock. Built for functionality and practicality, the table clock is elegant and stylishly designed to add an edge to your home. With contemporary and modern accents, the alarm clock will awaken you with its impeccable design and beauty. Crafted out of glass and metal, the table alarm clock is the perfect combination of efficiency and glamour. The top and base materials are made out of a firm aluminum frame...

Alarm clocks, like almost all other consumer goods in the United States, ceased production in the spring of 1942, as the factories which made them were converted over to war work during World War II, but they were one of the first consumer items to resume manufacture for civilian use, in November 1944.[13][14] By that time, a critical shortage of alarm clocks had developed due to older clocks wearing out or breaking down. Workers were late for, or missed completely, their scheduled shifts in jobs critical to the war effort.[14] In a pooling arrangement overseen by the Office of Price Administration, several clock companies were allowed to start producing new clocks, some of which were continuations of pre-war designs, and some of which were new designs, thus becoming among the first "postwar" consumer goods to be made, before the war had even ended.[15][16] The price of these "emergency" clocks was, however, still strictly regulated by the Office of Price Administration.[14]
“This little beauty works great. I bought it when the alarm on my mobile phone began to intermittently fail me. This little travel clock is beautiful in retro seafoam green and great for travel because its bright color ensures that you will never miss picking it up from your hotel nightstand at checkout. There is a faint, pleasant ticking, the hands glow in the dark, and the nightlight button is bright when needed. The pop-up alarm button is firm and works well though I am learning not to accidentally press it and turn the alarm off when picking up the clock. Overall, a fantastic alarm clock.”
×